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HLLN – Haiti News and Information 30 December 2007

Christmas in Hell by John Maxwell | Thank you | Between Falling and Hitting the Ground by Marguerite Laurent (Video Reel)…and other presentations of Ezili Dantò Spoken Word Theater Dance Company, including links to Marguerite’s ‘Capsized’, ‘The Red Sea,’ ‘Breaking Sea Chains’ and ‘Little Girl in the Yellow Sunday Dress’ …

Ezili Danto’s Note:

Onè La Sosyete,

As 2007 ends, I wish to thank all of you for hanging in there with us this most trying 3rd year of international occupation and globalization tyranny in Haiti. John Maxwell’s piece below entitled “Christmas in Hell” tells of the state of the majority of Haitians in Haiti today due to the barbarity of the most schooled, most prosperous and most educated of US/Euro peoples and governments on planet earth. There’s not much more to say, except, we at HLLN shall continue, as best we are able, to give voice to those that these folks and their tiny paid Black overseers would see silenced. It’s also the December Kwanzaa season, a time where we at HLLN, along with millions of Africans in the Diaspora and Pan-Africanists worldwide are paying homage to the Nguzo Saba principles. One of which is Self-Determination or Kujichagulia, which means, in Swahili, “to define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves instead of being defined, named, created for and spoken for by others.” That is what HLLN does all year round. But to thank you all for the concern and interests you’ve shown for our brutalized family in Haiti, here are recommended text, audio and video links to Ezili Danto’s Art-with-the-Ancestors performance pieces giving voice to the most voiceless of Dessalines’ descendants and most enjoyed by audiences throughout the years. Thank you.

If you find merit in this work, please consider making a donation or becoming an Ezili Dantò Listserve paying subscriber, so we may continue this work in 2008.

Maximum Respect, Marguerite ‘Ezili Dantò’ Laurent December 30, 2007

– Excerpt: Christmas in Hell by John Maxwell, ( Copyright©2007 John Maxwell jankunnu@gmail.com) December 29, 2007

– Links to : Between Falling and Hitting the Ground(Video Reel) and other presentations of Ezili Dantò Spoken Word Theater Dance Company, including ‘Capsized,’ ‘The Red Sea,’ ‘Breaking Sea Chains’ and ‘Little Girl in the Yellow Sunday Dress’

Donate to support this work: www.margueritelaurent.com/donate/donate.html

Recommended HLLN Links: Red, Black & Moonlight: Between Falling and Hitting the Ground by Marguerite Laurent (Video Reel)…and other presentations of Ezili Danto’s Spoken Word Theater Dance Company www.margueritelaurent.com/pressclips/rbmqt.html

Ezili’s Photo Gallery – www.margueritelaurent.com/headshot.html ; and www.margueritelaurent.com/photogallery/photogallery.html

PressKit – www.margueritelaurent.com/presskit.html

Master, Teenage and Children’s Haitian Dance Workshops (Video Clips) www.margueritelaurent.com/pressclips/performerpress.html#dance

Carnegie Hall |www.margueritelaurent.com/media/QT6_400_Streaming_NTSC.mov

Capsized and the Red Sea www.margueritelaurent.com/writings/capsized.html ; www.margueritelaurent.com/writings/redseaaudio.mp3 www.margueritelaurent.com/writings/capsized.mp3

Breaking Sea Chains www.margueritelaurent.com/writings/breakingchains_1.html

Little Girl in the Yellow Sunday Dress www.margueritelaurent.com/writings/littlegirl.html

So Much Like Here – RBM Jazzoetry Clip www.margueritelaurent.com/presskit/downloads/LikeHere.mp3

Christmas in Hell by John Maxwell, December, 2007

www.margueritelaurent.com/pressclips/Xmas.html#hell

Christmas in Jamaica is bad enough. One good thing about Christmas Day is that it means the end of weeks of aural assaults by mindless rhymesters perverting songs of worship to paeans of praise for hucksters of all kinds, from shopkeepers to banks, from auto parts dealers to purveyors of cheap, non-returnable, eminently breakable, non-biodegradable trash tricked out in plastic, tinsel and lead paint to lure innocent children and entrap their parents. And, as a bonus, there are the sound-system parties, which allow you to dance in your own home to music played two miles away.

An Alternative Scenario

If you think this is bad, consider another scenario.

Consider that you are a citizen of another land, one steeped in history – a history of resistance to oppression, a history which includes the first proclamation on Earth that all people were equal, including women and children.

This land, which for convenience we’ll call Ayiti, was introduced to Christianity by a bunch of marauding savages bearing swords and caparisoned in the fierce colours of their leader, a Genoese adventurer named Cristobal Colon, aka Christopher Columbus. This character had induced Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand, the monarchs of two Spanish kingdoms –Aragon and Castile – to bet their farms on the discovery of a new route to China, then as now, the fabulous land of magical herbs, spices and other goods which would make life bearable for the inhabitants of Europe, just emerging from the Dark Ages.

Our hero had managed to convince Ferdinand and Isabella on the basis of a map obtained from an African who claimed to know the way to China aka Cipangu. If the Spanish got to Cipangu before their European cousins, great wealth and power would be theirs; all the tea in China would be theirs for the asking, in addition to carpets, silks and luxuries only dreamt of in Europe.

When Columbus’ “doom burdened caravels” hove to in Ayiti, the million or so people who welcomed him could never have guessed that they would soon be history. Within thirty years the populations of the West Indies had been so reduced that in the four larger islands now re-christened the Greater Antilles) less than a thousand remained alive in 1519. This is according to the testimony of Bartholomew de las Casas, a Spanish monk who came with the conquistadors and was an eyewitness to the Conquest. Another historian, Gonzalo Oviedo, estimated that of the one million Indians on Ayiti when the Spaniards arrived, less than five hundred remained half a century later– the “natives and … the progeny and lineage “ of those who first occupied the land.

‘They died in heaps, like bedbugs …’

For entire article, go to: www.margueritelaurent.com/pressclips/Xmas.html#hell

Forwarded by Haitian Lawyers Leadership Network

  
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