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16/3/06

UN-Latortue Accord |Can the Devil bind Gods and Goddesses?: No UN protectorate for Haiti | Interview with Samba Boukman and Mackandal | HLLN appeals for support to AUMOHD to help liberate 64 young people | Ezili Danto Witness Project, radio interview direct from street of Site Soley

 

   

Date: 16 March 2006

HLLN Recomended Link:
“If you care about the truth than watch this, and share it with everyone.

video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-8260059923762628848&q=911

This video may actually get you up of your seat, and contacting every media outlet, and every government official and demanding an independent TRUTHFUL and open reinvestigation of 9/11 and your governments cover-up and or complicity in it. PLEASE, please if you care about anyone look at this video, and become informed.

ivan olsen
SF Bay area artist activist”
HLLN network collaborator
March 15, 2006

********************e-mails in this post***************

– Feb. 22, 2006 UN-Latortue Accord

– Can the Devil bind Gods and Goddesses? – No UN protectorate for Haiti
“No agreement, accord, treaty or contract signed by the illegal Latortue government binds the sovereign people of Haiti, the majority of us in the Diaspora or carries any legal or moral weight. It never shall.”

– Opening Space for Popular Movements: A Conversation with Samba Boukman and Samba Mackandal, Interviewed by Stuart Neatby, John Dimond-Gibson, and Christian Heyne | Thursday, March 2, 2006

– AUMOHD In Action For Human Right | AUMOHD AND THE CHRC (Community Human Rights Council) of Gran Ravin, Citè Soleil and Pele

– HLLN appeal to help our collaborating lawyers in Haiti – AUMOHD needs your support | AUHOHD WANTS TO HELP LIBERATE 64 YOUNG PEOPLE – AUMOHD Vle Libere 64 Jen, March 1, 2006

– Site Solèy demonstrates to demand arrest of Gèrard Latortue, Andy Apaid and Reginald Boulos, from the Ezili Danto Witness Project | Ezili Danto Witness Project brings you an English translation of another Kreyol Reporting and Interview Direct from the Streets of Site Solèy Haiti, March 15, 2006 (Broadcast in Kreyol on Levekanpe Radio ? March 15, 2006 ? 10:00 am) Translation done for HLLN from Kreyol original by Frantz Jerome

HLLN Note: In reference to this Kreyol interview, we note that the photos being circulated on the internet, since January 2006, by the coup d’etat folks showing Haitian CHILD SOLDIERS are coup d’etat propaganda, LIES, LIES, LIES. The photos are NOT of Haitians but Liberians and being passed off as real to help further criminalize Haiti’s young men and push for their summary execution without judicial review whatsover as per the request from Edwige Lalane of the outright execution of 5% of the people of Site Soley. The photographs, and a lot more are from the Civil War in Liberia and were taken in 2003 by Chris Hondros. You may check them at: www.chrishondrosphotography.com

– Photo showing Haitian CHILD SOLDIERS are coup d’etat propaganda, LIES, LIES, LIES. Another diabolical coup HOAX to criminalize the men, women, youth and children of Haiti and tighten the reigns of the defacto regime and UN-Latortue protectorate.

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February 22, 2006 Accord

Arrangement on the monitoring, restructuring and reforming of the Haitian National Police (HNP) and the restoration and maintenance of the rule of law, public order and public safety in Haiti

Supplemental to the Agreement between the United Nations and the Government of Haiti

Concerning the Status of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH)

Arrangement on the monitoring, restructuring and reforming of the Haitian National Police (HNP) and the restoration and maintenance of the rule of law, public order and public safety In Haiti

Supplemental to the Agreement between the United Nations and the Government of Haiti Concerning the Status of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH)

The Special Representative of the Secretary-General of the United Nations for Haiti and the Prime Minister of the Republic of Haiti;

Recalling the Agreement between the United Nations and the Government of Has Concerning the Status of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), done at Port-au-Prince on 9 July 2004 (the “SOFA”’:

Recalling paragraph 59 of the SOFA, in accordance with which the Special Representative of the Secretary-General and the Government of Haiti (the “Government” may conclude supplemental arrangements to the SOFA:

Recalling Security Council resolution 1542 (2004) of 30 April 2004, in which the Security Council, acting In this regard under Chapter Vll of the Charter of the United Nations, decided that MINUSTAH shall have the mandate, Inter Oa:

In support of the Transitional Government, to ensure a secure and stable environment within which the constitutional and political process In Haiti can take place;

to assist the Transitional Government In monitoring, restructuring and reforming the Haitian National Police, consistent with democratic policing standards, including through the vetting and certification of its personnel. advising on its reorganization and training, including gender training, as well as monitoring/mentoring members of the Haitian National Police;
to assist the Transitional Government, particularly the Haitian National Police, with comprehensive and sustainable Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration (DDR) programs for all armed groups, including women and children associated with such groups, as well as weapons control and public security measures;

to assist with the restoration and maintenance Of the rule of law, public safety and public order in Haiti through the provision inter ails of operational support to the Haitian National Police and the Haitian Gvaat Guard, as well as With their institutional strengthening, including the reestablishment of the corrections system;

to protect Untied Nations personnel, facilities, installations and equipment and to ensure the security and freedom of movement of its personnel, taxing into account the primary responsibility of the Transitional Government in that regard;

to protect civilians under imminent threat or physical violence, within its capabilities and areas of deployment, Without prejudice to the responsibilities cif the Transitional Government and of police authorities;

Recalling also that, in that same resolution, the Security Council decided that MINUSTAH shall also have the mandate, inter ails:

to assist the transitional Government in its efforts to organize, monitor and carry out free and fair municipal, parliamentary and presidential elections at the earliest possible date, in particular through the provision, Inter alia, of continued security;

to assist the Transitional Government in extending State authority throughout Haiti and support good governance at all levels;

Recalling other Security Council resolution 1608 (2005) of 22 June 2005, in which acting under chapter VII of the charter of the United Nations, the Security Council inter aria, extended the mandate of the Minustah and:

Requested the Secretary General to share with the council the reform plan for the Haitian National Police formulated by the Minustah and the Haitian authorities that was to include the antielpated size, standards. Implementation timetable and resources;

requested that MINUSTAH and the Haitian authorities take aft necessary steps to achieve Optimal coordination between MINUSTAH’s civilian police and the Haitian National Police;

Haiti to ensure that HNP personnel do not serve unless certified and to ensure that technical advice and recommendations provided by MINUSTAH are fully implemented by Haitian authorities at all levels without delay; and
urged the Transitional Government to conduct proper and transparent investigations into cases of human rights violation; particularly those allegedly involving HNP officers; and requested that in order to support this effort MINUSTAH make the Joint Special Investigation Unit operational as soon as possible;

Recognizing that the Transitional Government of the Republic of Haiti and Its successors are principally responsible for establishing a professional police service that is effective, efficient, consistent with democratic standards and meets the needs of Haitian people;

Recognizing also that the maintenance of security and stability in Haiti remains in the first place the responsibility of the Government of the Republic of Haiti and of its police authorities;

Recognizing the need to enable the Haitian National Police (the “HNP”) progressively to assume as great an extent of operational responsibility as is compatible with the maintenance of a secure and stable environment, the rule of law, public safety and public order in Haiti and as is commensurate with progress achieved in the restructuring and reform of the Haitian National Police, consistently with democratic policing standards;

Wishing to put in place, pursuant to Security Council resolution 1608 (2005) of 22 June 2005, necessary arrangements to achieve optimal coordination between MINUSTAH’s military units and civilian police and the Haitian National Police:

Wishing also to put in place, pursuant to Security Council resolutions 1542 (2004) and 1608 (2005) of 30 April 2004 and 22 June 2005, necessary common arrangements for the engagement of MINUSTAH and Its assets and of the Government of the Republic of Haiti in the monitoring, restructuring and reform of the Haitian National Police;

Have agreed as follows:

1. DEFINITIONS

For the purposes of this Supplemental Arrangement, the following definitions shall apply, in addition to those contained In Part I of the SOFA:
(a) Area of operation �OA� means a particular geographical area in which it is necessary to conduct security operation.
(b) �Certification� means the gradual process of provisional and final certification of the HNP personnel by Minustah, as described in Annex 1 to this supplemental Arrangement.
(c) “Haitian authorities” means the competent ministries, departments, authorities, operational units, agencies or arms of the Transitional Government of the Republic of Haiti and its successors;
(d) “Haitian National Police” or “HNP” means me national law-enforcement agency, including the Haitian Coast Guard and the corrections service, under the authority of the Government of Haiti:
(e) “HNP Reform Plan” or “Reform Plan” means the strategic plan for the development of the HNP, formulated by MINUSTAH and the Haitian authorities, that includes, inter alia, specifications of the anticipated size of the HNP and its various units, specifications of the standards which the HNP and HNP personnel are to meet, an Implementation timetable for the execution of the plan end specifications of the resources required for its implementation;
(f) “MINUSTAH Police Commissioner means the head of the police component of MINUSTAH.
(g) “MINUSTAH Security Support Components” means those parts of MINUSTAH which are constituted by a military component and a police component including Formed Police Units;
(h) �Rules of Engagement and Directives on the Use of Force� or “ROEIDIR” means directions Issued by the United Nations Headquarters to the MINUSTAH Force Commander and to the MINUSTAH Police Commissioner and directives issued by the Government to the Director-General of the HNP, which delineate inter alfa the parameters within which foece may be used in accordance with relevant principles of International law. Implementation of ROFJDIR is a command responsibility. Only United Nations Headquarters and the Government can make changes to their respective ROEIDIR;
(i) “Security Information” refers to information concerning actual and potential security threats, in particular intonation on the location, strength, capabilities and intentions of potentially hostile forces, groups or individuals,
(I) “Security Responsibility’ means responsibility for the security of a particular geographic area and the operational authority necessary to discharge that responsibility;

“Transitional Government” or “Government” means the existing Transitional Government of the Republic of Haiti and its successor(s).

2. Restructuring and Reforming the Haitian National Police (HNP)

2.1 Minustah and the Haitian Government shall work together closely to ensure the establishment of an effective, efficient and accountable Haitian National Police service which:
(a) meets democratic policing standards and emphasizes democratic values;
(b) respects human rights and the values of the rule of law;
(c) takes an impartial and non-partisan approach to the performance of its duties;
(d) rejects and eschews all corrupt practices;
(e) commands public respect and public confidence; and
(f) maintains and promotes respect for the rule of law, public safety, public order, security and stability in Haiti.

2.2 MINUSTAH, in consultation with the competent Haitian authorities, shall prepare a draft for the HNP Reform Plan and shall submit it to the Government no later than thirty (30) days after the entry-into-force of this Supplemental Arrangement for approval by the Conseil Superieur de la Police Nationale (CSPN) provided for in Annex Ito this Supplemental Arrangement Once approved by the competent Haitian authorities, the HNP Reform Plan shall constitute the basis for the restructuring, reorganization, reform and institutional strengthening of the HNP. Pending such 3PPIOVS, the draft HNP Development Plan shall provisionally serve as the basis for that process,

2.3 The Government may enter into bilateral and multilateral arrangements for the purpose of developing the capacity of the HNP, provided the nature and objectives of such arrangements are compatible with the HNP Reform Plan and MINUSTAH mandate. In order that MINUSTAH may assess whether a bilateral or multilateral arrangement might affect its mandated responsibilities or the implementation of the HNP Reform Plan:

(a) the Government shall advise MINUSTAH of the nature of a bilateral and multilateral arrangements that it intends to conclude and shall provide MINUSTAH with copies of those proposed arrangements. If MINUSTAH considers that a proposed bilateral or multilateral arrangement might conflict with its mandated responsibilities or the implementation of the HNP Reform Plan, the Government shall make such adjustments to that arrangement as MINUSTAH may indicate are needed in order to avoid such a conflict;

(b) the Government shall provide MINUSTAH with copies of any arrangements that it may have concluded before the entry-into-force of this Supplemental Arrangement and which remain operational. If MINUSTAH considers that such an arrangement might conflict with its mandated responsibilities or the implementation of the HNP Reform Plan, the Government shall take the necessary steps to make such adjustments to that arrangement as MINUSTAH may indicate are needed in order to avoid such a conflict

2.4 HNP reform shall be supported through a progressive program of certification of HNP personnel administered by MINUSTAH, as mandated by Security Council resolutions 1542 (2004) of 30 April 2004 and 1608 (2005) of 22 June 2005. That program shall be administered by security council and implemented in accordance with the principles set out in Annex II to this supplemental Arrangement in accordance with the Security Council resolution 1608 (2005) in order that an individual may serve or continue to serve the PNH in any of its units or sections and at any rank 3rd level, it shall be necessary that he certified for service by Minustah pursuant to the program referred to above and that such certification is current and valid. Individuals who have not been certified for service or whose certification of service has not been renewed by Minustah and has ceased to be valid and current may not serve or continue to serve with HNP or any of its units or sections and may not otherwise perform any law-enforcement function in Haiti. The government shall ensure that the service with the HNP or any such individual is terminated forthwith and that he or she is precluded from service during the currency of the supplemental arrangement in any position within the HNP or otherwise performing any law-enforcement functions in Haiti.

2.5 Without prejudice to Section 2.4 above and subject to Section 2.6 below, all decisions regarding the retention, promotion, discipline and dismissal of HNP personnel shall rest with and be taken by the competent Haitian authorities. In taking their decisions in such matters, the Haitian authorities shall take into account any advice given by MINUSTAH in accordance with Security Council resolution 1608 (2005).

2.6. No promotion of HNP personnel shall take place unless the individual officer concerned has first successfully completed a vetting process devised and administered by MINUSTAH.

2.7 MINUSTAH. in consultation with Me competent authorities of the Government shall prepare draft minimum selection criteria for new recruits seeking to enter service with the HNP and shall submit them to the Government no later than forty-five (45) days after the entry-into-force of this Supplemental Arrangement for approval by the Conseil Superieur de la Police Nationale (CSPN) provided for in Annex I to this Supplemental Arrangement. Once approved by the CSPN, those criteria shall constitute the minimum selection criteria for selection for service with the HNP. Pending such approval, the draft criteria shall
provisionally serve as such.

2.8 Without prejudice to the above, the Haitian authorities at all levels shall accept and fully implement without delay technical advice and recommendations provided by MINUSTAH regarding the monitoring, restructuring, reforming, reorganization and training of the HNP.

2.9 Without prejudice to the generality of Section 9.3 below, the Government, acting in close coordination and consultation with MINUSTAH, shall ensure the prompt Preparation, drafting and adoption, issuance, promulgation or enactment, as appropriate, of such directives, rules, decrees, executive Instruments or legislation as may be necessary to ensure the proper, effective and lawful Implementation of the HNP Reform Plan, the certification program and technical advice and recommendations provided by MINUSTAH pursuant to Sections 2.2, 2.4 and 2.8 above.

2.10 In order to ensure thorough and transparent investigations of cases of suspected human rights violations allegedly involving HNP personnel, the Haitian authorities shall make all necessary information available to MINUSTAH’s Joint Special Investigation Unit and shall ensure full cooperation et all levels with itlrestigdl1005 QoNUc1vcl ay that Unit Acting In cooperation with MINUSTAH, the Government shall develop Its national capacity to investigate such violations.

3. BASIC PRINCIPLES FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF THE RULE OF LAW, PUBLIC SAFETY AND PUBLIC ORDER IN HAITI

3.1 Pursuant to its mandate under Security Council Resolution 1542 (2004), as extended, MINUSTAH has the responsibility, in support of the Transitional Government, to ensure a secure and stable environment within which the constitutional and political process In Haiti can take place and to assist with the restoration and maintenance of the rule of law, public safety and public order In Haiti through the provision Inter aria of operational support to the Haitian National Police and the Haitian Coast Guard.

32 The SRSG shall determine which security tasks that are necessary to secure these objectives are most appropriate for performance by MINUSTAH Security Support Components, which are most appropriate for performance by the HNP and which are most appropriate for performance by the HNP acting with the operational support of MINUSTAH Security Support Components. In making this determination, the SRSG shall, whenever and wherever possible, act in close consultation with the competent Haitian authorities and take duly Into account the current capacity and operational capabilities of the HNP end its relevant units and sections.

3.3 The HNP leadership shall ensure that no HNP deployment or operations are undertaken without prior consultation and coordination with the MINUSTAH Police Commissioner or his or her designate, except where the possibility for the HNP so to deploy or to conduct such operations without such prior consultation and coordination is expressly provided for In written policies or procedures jointly developed and agreed by the Director General of the HNP and the MINUSTAH Police Commissioner.

3.4 It is envisaged that, as the HNP Reform Plan and the certification program are implemented and the operational capacity of the HNP increases and strengthens, the HNP will progressively play a greater role in ensuring a secure and stable environment and in restoring and maintaining the rule of law, public safety and public order. In particular, it is envisaged that operational responsibility for maintaining security, stability, the rule of taw, public safety and public order in specific geographical areas or for performing specific categories of operational tasks or functions will eventually be assumed by the HNP, pursuant to written agreements between the SRSG and the Director General of the HNP.

3.5 Notwithstanding the HNP may have assumed operational responsibility for ensuring a secure and stable environment and restoring and maintaining the rule of law, public safety and public order in a specific geographical area in accordance with Section 3.4 above, the Government of Haiti may nevertheless request MINUSTAH temporarily to resume operational responsibility for discharging those tasks, in whole or in part, in or with respect to that area. Detailed provisions on the content communication and compliance with such requests are set out in Annex Ill to this Supplemental Arrangement.

3.6 MINUSTAH Security Support Components and the HNP shall at all times operate under their awn separate and Independent chains of command and control. No elements of MINUSTAH shall command elements of the HNP; nor shall any elements of the HNP command MINUSTAH Security Support Components or any of their constituent elements. MINUSTAH Security Support Components and the HNP shad each have and maintain their own respective ROE/DIR. Neither the SRSG, nor the Force Commander, nor the Police Commissioner, nor any other member of MINUSTAH is authorized to receive instructions from any official of the Government or from any HNP personnel, Including with respect to the discharge by MINUSTAH of Security Responsibility for and within an AO, where such responsibility has been temporarily transferred to MINUSTAH pursuant to Annex III to this Supplemental Arrangement

3.7 The fact that the SRSG may have determined that a security task is most appropriate for performance by MINUSTAH Security Support Components shall not preclude the HNP from providing individual HNP personnel to assist MINUSTAH Security Support Components with language and local guidance when so requested by those Components; nor shell it preclude HNP personnel from accompanying those Components for training purposes pursuant to their applicable training plan.

4. PLANNING CONSULTATION AND INFORMATION EXCHANGE

4.1 The Minustah Police Commissioner, the Force Commander and representative of the HNP, shall as soon as practicable following entry-into-Force of the Supplemental Arrangement jointly develop draft contingency plan concerning their operational collaboration.

4.2 The following consultation arrangements and mechanisms shall be established and be made operational immediately following the entry-into-force of this Supplemental Arrangement:

(a) Senior representatives of the Government and the SRSG shall meet regularly to consider and discuss MINUSTAH support and assistance to the Government for the maintenance of security and stability and with the restoration and maintenance of the rule of law, public safety and public order in Haiti.

(b) Senior officers of the HNP and of the MINUSTAH police and military components shall meet regularly to consider and discuss issues relevant to the discharge of their respective responsibilities.

(c) Subject to authorization by the SRSG, senior officers of the MINUSTAH police and military components shall be made available to the Government, at Its request, to attend ministerial-level meetings or to discuss and advise on important security issues.

(d) MINUSTAH and the Government shall establish a dedicated telephone line for use in emergency situations by the SRSG, the MINUSTAH Force Commander, the MINUSTAH Police Commissioner, the Prime Minister, the Minister of Justice and Public Security and the Director General of the HNP. MINUSTAH shall also provide these persons with mobile telephones exclusively for use in such situations.

4.3 Subject to the requirements of operational security, legal considerations (including the relevant provisions of the SOFA), statutory limitations and the mandates of their respective services, the MINUSTAH military and police components and the HNP shall exchange security information and shall otherwise cooperate, wherever and whenever possible, by passing on to each other any available information that would facilitate their operations of their respective services.

4.4 The Transitional Government shall provide members of MINUSTAH performing functions under this Supplemental Arrangement, including the HNP Reform Plan and the Certification Program, with:

(a) free, Immediate and unrestricted access to all offices, facilities and institutions, including prisons and places of detention, where the HNP and HNP personnel may be deployed, work or operate;

(b) free, immediate and unrestricted access to any and all sources of information, materials, files, records, documentation and archives within the possession or under the authority or control of the HNP or other Haitian authorities, including prosecutorial, Investigative or judicial authorities, that relate to the organization, management, training, functioning or operations of the HNP or to the recruitment, retention, promotion, training, performance or activities of individual HNP personnel;

( c) full and unhindered freedom to meet with and to interview all persons in possession of information considered necessary by the Minustah to the fulfillment of its responsibilities pursuant to this Supplemental Arrangement, including representatives of national and local authorities, HNP personnel, persons accused or convicted of involvement in crimes. That shall include freedom to meet and interview such persons in conditions of privacy and confidentiality, as deemed necessary. In the case of persons in detention, meetings and interviews will be conducted in the presence of members in the prison service.

5. OPERATIONAL AUTHORITY AND RESTRICTIONS
When providing security assistance pursuant to this Supplemental Arrangement, MINUSTAH Security support Components will operate in strict accordance with their ROE/DIR

6. ANCILLARY UNDERSTANDINGS
The MINUSTAH military and police components and the HNP may conclude ancillary understandings, as approved by the SRSG and relevant Haitian authorities, that are consistent with this Supplemental Arrangement

7. SETTLEMENT OF DISPUTES
Without prejudice to Part Ylll of the SOFA, any dispute between MINUSTAH and the
Government concerning the interpretation and application of this Supplemental Arrangement shall be settled by negotiations.

8. AMENDMENT, ENTRY-INTO�FORCE AND TERMINATION
8.1 This Supplemental Arrangement may be amended by the written agreement of the SRSG and the Government.

8.2 This Supplement Arrangement shall enter into force upon signature.

8.3 This Supplemental Arrangement shall terminate an such date as the mandate of MINUSTAH expires or is terminated by the Security Council.

9. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS
9.1 This Supplemental Arrangement is supplemental to the SOFA. It is subject to that agreement and shall not be understood to derogate from any of its terms.

9.2 This Supplemental Arrangement does not apply to, nor shall it in any way affect, the discharge by MINUSTAH of its other responsibilities pursuant to its mandate. Including regular liaison, patrolling and monitoring by its military and police components.

9.3 The Ministry of Justice and Public Security, the HNP and other relevant Haitian authorities, acting in consultation with MINUSTAH, shall without delay adopt such decrees, directives and other issuances as may be necessary to facilitate and ensure the smooth, proper and effective implementation of this Supplemental Arrangement

Done at New York the 22 day of February 2006, in two original copies in the English and French languages, each text being equally authentic

For the United Nations
Juan Gabriel Valdes
Special Representative

For the Government of Haiti
Gerard Latortue
Prime Minister
Of the Secretary General for Haiti

Annex I
Consultative Body Conseil Superieur de la Police Nationale ICSPN1
1. The Conseil Superieur de la Police Nationale (CSPN), acting on behalf of the Transitional Government of the Republic of Haiti, shall be responsible for:

(a) Considering and approving approval the draft HNP Reform Plan submitted by Minustah in accordance with section 2.2 of this Supplemental Agreement;
(b) Considering and approving the draft minimum selection criteria submitted by Minustah in accordance with section 2.6 of this Supplemental Agreement.

2. The CSPN shall establish its own working procedures and decide on the dates and times of its meetings, and shall establish subsidiary working-level bodies as appropriate.

Annex II
Certification program
1. The restructuring and reform of the Haitian National Police (HP) shall take place through a progressive process that will combine academic training, on-the-job training and regular monitoring. This will enable HNP officers to assume increasing responsibilities as their technical skills and professionalism develop, while respecting the Security Council’s stipulation in Resolution 1608 (2005) that HNP personnel should not serve unless certified,

2. The certification program shall consist of the following three stages:
(a) registration:
(b) provisional certification;
(c) final certification

A. Registration

3. All individuals serving with the HNP or any of its units or services at the time of the entry-into-fume of this Supplemental Arrangement shall be identified and registered by MINUSTAH.

4. All graduates from the HNP Academy shall be registered by MINUSTAH.

(B) Provisional Certification

5. M individuals who have been registered by MiN USTAH in accordance with Section A of this Annex shall be provisionally certified for service with the HNP by MINUSTAH,

6. Provisional certification for service with the HNP shall be valid for one year. At the end of that period, provisional certification for service with the HNP shall be renewable by MINUSTAH for successive periods of one year.

7. All HNP personnel who have been provisionally certified for service with the HNP by MINUSTAH shall be issued by MINUSTAH with a card certifying this, Indicating the date on which such provisional certification was granted and the date or dates, if any, on which it was renewed. The card shall also state that the provisional certification of the HNP personnel concerned shall cease to be valid one year from the date on With it was first issued or was last renewed.

8. All HNP personnel who hold valid and current provisional certification for service with the HNP shall be authorized to undertake law-enforcement activity, under HNP command, in an on-the-job training capacity.

9. All HNP personnel who are provisionally certified for service with the HNP shall undergo training, in accordance with the requirements laid dawn in the HNP Reform Plan.

As that training progresses and the ability and skills of such HNP personnel increase and are strengthened, individual HNP personnel shall progressively assume greater levels of operational responsibility and perform increasingly complex, specialized or sensitive tasks. The Director General of the HNP, acting on the advice of the MINUSTAH Police Commissioner, shall issue directives, In accordance with the HNP Reform Plan, defining the differing levels of operational responsibility and various operational tasks to which individual HNP personnel who are, provisionally certified for service with the HNP may be assigned. The assignment of such individual HNP personnel to those various levels of operational responsibility and operational tasks shall be made by competent Haitian authorities acting in accordance with the advice of co-located Minustah police advisers.

10. The performance of individual HPN personnel who are provisionally certified for service with the HPN in term inter alia of their technical skills, professional demeanor adherence to democratic policing standards gender sensitivity and respect for human rights shall be evaluated on a monthly basis by co-located Minustah police advisers.

11. Renewal by MINUSTAH of the provisional certification of individual HNP personnel Shall depend upon their satisfactory completion of training activities, their satisfactory performance of their duties and their proven adherence to democratic policing standards, gender sensitivity and respect for human rights.

12. The MINUSTAH Police Commissioner shall elaborate detailed standards regarding the training that HNP personnel must undertake and the performance-attainment standards that they must meet, including with respect to adherence to democratic policing standards and respect for human rights, in order for their provisional certification to be renewed. These standards shall be made known and available to all HNP personnel who hold valid and current provisional certification for service with the HNP‑

13. In the event that MINUSTAH does not renew the provisional certification of a member of HNP personnel. It shall provide the individual concerned with a written explanation, together with the relevant particulars.

Full certification

14. Individuals who have been registered by MINUSTAH in accordance with Section A of this Annex and who have been provisionally certified by MINUSTAH for a minimum of two years of service with the HNP shall be eligible for full certification by MINUSTAH for service with the HNP,

15. Full certification by MINUSTAH of Individual HNP personnel for service with the HNP shall depend upon their satisfactory Completion of training activates, their satisfactory performance of their duties and their proven adherence to democratic policing standards, gender sensitivity and respect for human rights.

16. The MINUSTAH Police Commissioner shall elaborate detailed standards regarding the training that HNP personnel must have undertaken and the performance-attainment standards that they must have met, including with respect to adherence to democratic policing standards and respect for human rights, in order for them to be granted full certification. These standards shell be made known and available to all HNP personnel who hold valid and current provisional certification for ‘service with the HNP.

17. In the event that MINUSTAH does not grant full certification to a member of HNP personnel for service with the HNP, it shall provide the individual concerned with a written explanation, together with the relevant particulars.

18. The denial of full certification to a member of HNP personnel shall not prelude him or her from being granted a renewal of provisional certification for service with the HNP.

19. All HNP personnel who have been granted full certification for service with the HNP by MINUSTAH shall be issued by MINUSTAH with a card certifying this.

(D) Ancillary Provision

20. Immediately after the entry-into-force of this Supplemental Arrangement, the government shall provide Minustah with the necessary documentation identifying all individuals who are serving with the HNP or any of its units or service at that

21. The government shall require all individuals who are provisionally certified by Minustah for service with the HNP to provide Minustah with such information regarding their personal and professional conduct and activities, their financial dealings and their property holdings a Minustah may require for the purpose of deciding on the renewal of their provisional certification or the grant to them of full certification for service with the HNP.

22. In accordance with Section 4,4 of this Supplemental Arrangement and without prejudice to the generality of that provision, the Government shall, without delay, without restriction, qualification or exception and free of charge; make available to MINUSTAH such documentation, records or information within its possession or under its control as MINUSTAH may request for the purpose of enabling it to decide on the renewal of the provisional certification of HNP personnel or the grant of full certification to them.

Annex III

REQUESTS BY THE HNP FOR RENEWED SECURITY ASSISTANCE FROM MINUSTAH

(A) Requests for Security Assistance

1. Notwithstanding that the HNP may have assumed regional responsibility for ensuring a secure and stable environment and restoring and maintaining the rule of law public safety and public cadre in a specific geographical area in accordance with section 3.4 of this Supplemental Arrangement, the government may nevertheless request renewed security assistance from Minustah in or with respect to that area.

2. Such requests shall be made for and on behalf of the Government by the Prime Minister,

3. Requests by the Government for security assistance shall:
be made in writing; .
be addressed to the SRSGi
include at least the following details:
(i) a description of the circumstances which require security assistance;
(ii) the geographical location or area in which security assistance is needed;
(iii) the type of security assistance requested from among those that MINUSTAH may provide pursuant to paragraph 7 of this Annex;
(iv) the period of time for which it is expected that security assistance will be needed; and
(v) the objective of the security assistance.

4. The SRSG shall decide whether the request can be acceded to, taking into account. Inter alia, MINUSTAH’s mandate and capabilities, the impact on current or future MINUSTAH operations, the policies of the Government and any Instructions from the Secretary-General of the United Nations. The SRSG shall respond to the request in writing. In approving any request, the SRSG may place conditions on the security assistance that MINUSTAH will provide in response and pursuant to that request.

5. In case of emergency situations, the SRSG may designate alternative approval procedures for requests by the Government for security assistance. As soon as practical after the making of any such request, the request and MINUSTAH’s response thereto shall be confirmed by the Parties in writing and procedures followed shall be fully documented.

6. Following receipt of the SRSG’s written approval, the Force Commander and Police Commissioner shall, in consultation with the SRSG, assign MINUSTAH Security Support Components resources and assets necessary to respond to the request.

B) Temporary transfer of security responsibility to MINUSTAH

7. The security assistance that is requested by the Government is of the form described in paragraph 16 (g) (h) (i) (o) or (k) of this Annex, the following provision shall apply.

8. There shall be a temporary transfer of security responsibility from the Government to Minustah for the AO concerned.

9. Security Responsibility for the AO shall be transfer to Minustah prior to the deployment of Minustah security Support Component in that AO.

10. Once Security Responsibility for the AO has been transferred to Minustah, it shall remain with Minustah, which such time as Minustah shall transfer it back to the Government.

11. Transfer of Security Responsibility from the Government to MINUSTAH for an AC) shall be effected by the signature of a transfer pro-forma. The pro-forma shall be signed:

(a) for the Government:
(I) by the Prime Minister of Halt, or
(ii) by a senior official designated by him or her for that purpose, the identity of whom shall be communicated by the Prime Minister in writing to the SRSG;
(b) for MINUSTAH, by the SRSG or his designated representative.

12. The transfer pro-forma shall define the AO for which Security Responsibility is being temporarily transferred by the Government to MINUSTAH.

13. For the duration of the temporary transfer of Security Responsibility for an AO to MINUSTAH:
(a) the Government’s Security Responsibility in the AO shall be suspended;
(b) the HNP shall have no operational role In the AO and shall withdraw it personnel from that AO as soon as possible, except as may be specified by the designated commander of the MINUSTAH Security Support Components with security responsibility for that AO;
(c) in effecting such withdrawal, the commanding officers of the HNP personnel concerned shall comply with requests from the designated commander of the MINUSTAH Security Support Components with security responsibility for that
AO;
(d) without prejudice to the foregoing, HNP shall provide the MINUSTAH Security Support Components with language and local guidance in the AO when so requested by the designated commander of the MINUSTAH Security Support Components with responsibility for that AO.

14. MINUSTAH shall transfer Security Responsibility back to the Government on the termination of its provision of security assistance. This transfer will be effected by:

(a) the signature of a transfer pro-forma by the SRSG or his designated representative: and
(b) the communication of that signed transfer pro-forma to the Office of the Prone Minister of Haiti or, if applicable, of tie senior official designated by him in accordance with paragraph 11 (a) (ii) above.

C. Circumstances in which security assistance may be requested fro Minustah

15. Subject to approval requirements contained in this Annex, Minustah may provide security assistance to the Government in the following circumstances;

(a) Threats to public safety and order which are of such a magnitude or nature that they are, in the opinion of the SRSG, likely to overwhelm the capacity of the HNP;
(b) Property damage, or potential damage, that it is beyond the capability of the HNP to prevent or avert, including, but not limited to, damage caused or threatened by arson and by exploded ordnance or its disposal:
(c) Potential threats to the security of high-level officials which It Is beyond the capacity of the HNP to counter or avert;
(d) Natural or man-made disasters, including, but not limited to, those caused by cyclones, earthquakes storms, fire and flooding; and
(e) Of other significant circumstances which the SRSG, in consultation with the MINUSTAH Police Commissioner and Force Commander, determines warrant the assistance of MINUSTAH Security Support Components.

(D) forms of security assistance

18. Subject to the approval requirements contained in this Arrangement, MINUSTAH may, through the MINUSTAH Security Support Components and in accordance with its ROFJDIR, provide the following types of security assistance to the Government
(a) Provide logistic support to enable the HNP to operate beyond its normal capability, including through the provision of transport, rations, accommodation, communications and medical support.
(b) Rescue and recovers& Assist civilian victims of natural or man-made disasters.
(c) Clean-up operations: Clean up following natural or man-made disasters.
(d) Patrol present: Conduct foot, vehicle or aerial patrols.
(e) Armed escorts: Protect vulnerable civilian convoys in support of the civil power,
(f) Protection of key sites: Protect key national properties and elements of infrastructure in support of the civil power.
(g) Checkpoints: Establish and conduct static or mobile checkpoints.
(h)Cordon: Provide an outer perimeter or cordon around an incident site
(i) Crowd control: Control and disperse crowds for public safety in support of the civil power.
(j) Detaining, searching and disarming: Detain, search and disarm persons, vehicles or premises.
(k) Recapture of key sites: Recapture and reoccupy key national facilities and elements of infrastructure in support of the civil power.

(E)Planning

17. The MINUSTAH Police Commissioner, the Force Commander and the Director General of the HNP shall, as soon as practicable following the entry-Into-force of this Supplemental Arrangement, jointly develop draft contingency plans detailing the security assistance that MINUSTAH may make available to the Government pursuant to this Annex. Copies of these plans shall promptly be provided to the SRSG for approval.

(F) Proviso

18. The provisions of this Annex shall in no way limit the competence and the authority of MINUSTAH, pursuant to its mandate, to take action, without any prior request from the Government, to ensure a secure and stable environment in Haiti, to protect United Nations personnel, facilities, Installations and equipment, to ensure the security and freedom of MINUSTAH personnel or to protect civilians under imminent threat of physical violence.

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Can the Devil bind Gods and Goddesses? – No UN protectorate for Haiti

The Feb. 22, 2006 agreement between Gerard Latortue and the UN, putting Haiti under UN protectorate is illegal and immoral.

The people of Haiti never recognized the Latortue government as legitimate, neither did all in the “international community.”

More than one third of the countries in the UN do not officially recognize the Latortue regime as the legitimate government of the people of Haiti. That is, 53 countries from Africa, CARICOM with 15 countries, Venezuela and Cuba. Please take note, neither do the majority of Haitians in the Diaspora, or the official body of the Congressional Black Caucus. Together we stand since Feb. 29, 2004, together we shall regain Haiti’s sovereignty. And once the truth about the tiny criminal gangs with suits, come to fore, the world will stand with us, because we stand for democracy, the rule of law and the principles of self-determination and liberty. We do not stand for rule by force, or the ouster of a duly elected government through the use of lies, half-truths, propaganda, or lawlessness. We do not stand for repression and tyranny or for profit over people principles. But the sacred principles of liberty and equality cherished by human being the world over, which sacred principles are being trampled upon the world over, right now, by a small group of suited criminals, members of the Washington Consensus (neoliberalism cabal) and their stooges, who are using all their force to hurt the very peoples and constituencies they have sworn to protect, respect and represent.

Indeed, the Haitian constitution and international laws were violated to bring into power the Baco Raton regime and the people of Haiti have struggled, for two years now, to lift Gwo Jera and his Middle Eastern Haitian inbreed cabal and US/Euro settlers off their necks. The struggle continues. It’s been publicly reported that Lilianne Pierre Paul and several other Group 184 Nazi fascists have said that they would see Haiti as a protectorate before letting the people’s elected President, Rene Preval, take office.

The UN Security Council obviously allies with these tiny, anti-democratic Haitians and has done so, ILLEGALLY, and in contravention of the HAITIAN CONSTITUTION, the UN mandate and international laws, since Feb. 29, 2004. Nothing has changed, protectorate was their aim in 2003 when these foreign coup plotters met at Ottawa, and it is their aim now. The “Aristide card” was their ticket to confusing those who needed an excuse to sell the country.

Nonetheless, let it be known, that the people of Haiti are a sovereign people, who have been fighting for their liberty since before 1791 and Bwa Kayiman. We were the first kidnapped captives to be brought to the New World and the first and only African captives to win our independence in combat against the white settlers and Euro/US slave owning countries. The first also to actually PAY, in hard cash, to the tune of $21.7 billion dollars in today�s currency, for that independence. The final, of that slave-trade payment, made to powerful and richest, United States of America, by Haiti, in 1947.

Over and over again the Haitian poor have paid for their liberty. Most recently, from Feb. 29, 2004 to today, in the blood of over 14,000 poor Haitians slaughtered so that Boulos, Apaid, Guy Phillip, Lilianne Pierre Paul and their foreign masters could try to set up an election to give a “democratic” veneer to their tyranny. It didn’t work because the people of Haiti are the most valiant fighters for liberty on this planet, bar none.

Yet and still the Lilianne Pierre Pauls, Boulos, Apaids, Bakers, Yourie Latortues, their Guy Philippe kidnappers, these power-grabbers who hold Haitian justice and law hostage for their own greed and personal interests and their apologists still won’t admit defeat, would rather have a protectorate than let the people rule themselves and participate in the affairs of the state. To that end, they have now set about to reduce the Feb. 7, 2006 vote to merely an OPINION poll with the help of Ottawa, Washington, Paris and the UN.

But we Haitians have fought against the US ambassadors and representatives in Haiti bringing us instability, poverty, division, polarizing our society and upholding parallel governments to Haiti’s elected governments. We have achieved over and over again against the most educated, most connected, richest, and most resourceful in the world, and will continue to do so because truth, decency and goodness is what we extend. Because the people of Haiti extend the God within, what they are, no weapon of evil can or shall EVER destroy us.

We Haitians, in the Diaspora, we Haitians at the Haitian Lawyers Leadership Network with our true friends from all the nations, we, we Haitians who know who we are and the good that lives within us that the powerful Neocons are trying to criminalize, we shall continue to stand, as ONE voice, one PSYCHE, one POWER, with the people of Haiti, for ourselves, for what we are. We shall not kneel or bow to tyranny even if it is being metered out by the supposedly highest and most develop world order for our children, for the Ancestors, (zanset yo e timoun yo), and because being “Ayisyen” is to our glory. Haiti was not a gift given to Haitians by the whites. It was the blood of our ancestors that ran redder than the Atlantic Ocean is wide. No imposed Baco Raton regime can gift Haiti to the white settlers. By the blood of the African slaves, by the African holocaust, we Haitians hereby swear it shall never be so.

The white enslavers took 300 years from us and have kept us contained in poverty for 200 years more to pay for that independence, the last payment made, in 1947, to the very United States of America, now trying to teach Haiti about “democracy” and law and justice.

The fire of the African ancestors who first put liberty into application, the fire in our DNA would suffocate us before allowing Haiti to be colonized and put into slavery, ever again.

NOTHING, no agreement, no contract, no treaty, no accord, no devil’s pact, signed by the illegally imposed Boca Raton government, or any of the other Group 184 self-styled Black overseers for Haiti on behalf of the people of Haiti is legal. Moreover, no semantics, No gyration on the part of Officialdom will make it so. In fact, no one on earth can Gede like the people of Haiti. How could the UN Security Council or Latortue gyrations have any meaning to us? We dance to our own drums, that is the only point of reference Haitians know. And we know also, very well, the Boca Raton regime is not recognized as legitimate by the majority of the peoples of Haiti, by the Congressional Black Caucus, the African Union or Caricom.

This Feb. 22 2006 accord is as worthless as the agreement that sent MINUSTHA to Haiti. A MINUSTHA that brings to the help of “democracy” in Haiti soldiers from the most undemocratic countries on earth, including China and Jordan. A MINUSTHA we now hear will be sending Haiti judges to help us “reform” from all over the world, including judges to “help” Haitians from Mauritania – a place where SLAVERY is still acceptable.

Again, the struggle is for Haitian dignity, self-respect and self-determination. Our enemies know very well the people of Haiti know more about human cooperation, co-existence and simple humility than all the powers in the UN Security Council, Ottawa, Washington and France who brought us another coup d’etat. Our enemies are all those who stand with Latortue and his murders and international criminals.

We Haitians will peacefully regain our liberty from these powers using their own murderous weight. Batay la fèk komanse the struggle has just begun. If the powers that be won’t let Haiti live free. Haiti, small tiny, impoverished Haiti shall show the rest of the world that nothing matters more than freedom. These discredited and greedy Neocons may repress the entire world, but Haiti shall fight against enslavement and show others who are enchained how it’s done. Libèrte ou la mort. That’s been our legacy and we live it for humanity.

No agreement, accord, treaty or contract signed by the illegal Latortue government binds the sovereign people of Haiti, the majority of us in the Diaspora or carries any legal or moral weight. It never shall.

Marguerite Laurent, Esq.
Chair and Founder, Haitian Lawyers Leadership Network
(Dedicated to protecting the civil, cultural and human rights of Haitians living at home and abroad and to institutionalizing the rule of law)
March 7, 2007

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Opening Space for Popular Movements: A Conversation with Samba Boukman and Samba Mackandal

Interviewed by Stuart Neatby, John Dimond-Gibson, and Christian Heyne. Rush Transcript. [i] Thursday, March 2, 2006

The desperately poor neighbourhoods surrounding Haiti’s capital of Port-au-Prince have been hardest hit by the political violence and social cleansing directed against Haiti’s poor by the US, Canadian, and French- imposed government of Gerard Latortue. The neighbourhood of Bel Air has been one of the hardest hit of these neighbourhoods, facing daily shootings and arrests from both the Haitian National Police as well as the UN/MINUSTAH forces.

We had a chance to speak with Samba Boukman and Samba Mackandal, two grassroots organizers in Bel Air, on March 2 nd about their reactions to the February 7th elections, the political and social repression they’ve suffered, and their hopes for a process of national reconciliation following the election of Rene Preval as Haiti’s President. The following is a rush transcript of that interview.

SJC: We wanted to ask a few questions about the elections that just happened. A number of officials and the top electoral monitors [from the Canadian government] have described this election as being the best that Haiti has ever had. What is your response to that?

SB: As the popular movement of poor disenfranchised people known as Lavalas, we have always had only one weapon: the Democratic Weapon, which is one man, one vote.

After 200 years of independence, on Dec 16th,1990, Haiti held the first democratic election in its entire history. That is when we, the people from poor neighbourhoods, got to elect Jean Bertrand Aristide, the poor priest, as a president who could represent us. So in 1991 there was a clear threat to democracy when some countries like France, United States and Canada joined to a minority of people – who now have organized themselves as the Group 184 � who organized a coup against Aristide and all of the people of Haiti. But because of the support and help of real friends of Haiti, what we call Bon Blans, the people had a chance to get through it [when Aristide was returned to power in 1994]. So with the solidarity from the Black Caucus, the Clinton administration, and the mobilization of people here in Haiti, the people finally got the return of the president they had elected.

So the return of democracy helped relieve a lot of problems in poor neighbourhoods because it gave us access to food, health care, potable water, and different other basic needs. But that didn’t stop the international community and also a minority of the wealthy people in Haiti, from again organizing a coup [in 2004] against the needs of Haiti, causing suffering in the poor neighbourhoods, and bloodshed all over again.

As a people descended from African slaves, we believe in the democratic way. We believe that there is one way to take power, and this is by voting someone that we trust in. So after the coup of Feb 29 we have been mobilizing for a very long time, protesting in the streets peacefully, in order to call for the respect of our vote.

But we have been mobilizing also against exclusion, the social exclusion that people in poor neighbourhoods are victims of. Because when we talk about social exclusion, it’s because the wealthy people in Haiti � joined with some of the wealthy countries � they wanted to have elections but without the people of the poor neighbourhoods.

So when we say that the wealthy countries and the wealthy people in Haiti tried to stop the people in poor neighbourhoods from voting, that’s clear because we have a lot of evidence of it. They committed killings very often in the poor neighbourhoods, so that the people would move away. They didn’t have polling centers in the poor neighbourhoods so people would be discouraged from voting. They called our neighbourhoods no-man’s-lands so that people would not visit and find out about our suffering and our struggles. Many people here do not have food to eat and potable water to drink but they do have the idea that their votes should be respected. They remember September 16th 1990 and they wanted this to occur again through the new elections that just happened.

For us, the vote of February 7th 2006 has a real meaning: it is a clear answer to the coup of 2004. We wanted to show to the wealthy people, who organized themselves as the Group 184, that we will not let them exclude us from the political decision making process and that they cannot take everything for themselves. We wanted to show that we are still part of the country. It was a slap in the face of the defacto Gerard Latortue/Boniface Alexander government to have so many poor people vote.

But compare this slap in the face to the repression that we have been subjected to. We have been imprisoned just because of our political affiliation. We have been victims of different massacres, but we still decided to organize against all of this oppression.

Some people seem to think that the people who live here are all illiterate and that we don’t deserve to have the same vote as everyone else. So that is why we gave them this response � to show that we know what we need and we know how to get it. So while people may say that we are illiterate and that we don’t know anything about democracy, our vote was a clear response to tell them that we know politics better then they do. It was quite a lesson for them because it was above their understanding, what the people accomplished on Feb 7 th. Even part of the international community shares the opinion of the elite here � thinking that people in poor neighbourhoods are just dumb and crazy and don’t know what to do.

So our vote on February 7th was a clear response to them too. Our vote was a vote for the release of all political prisoners. We voted for a real national reconciliation through a dialogue of the people which will allow us to move towards peace in Haiti. The vote was not the only step. We will be voting again for the senate so that Preval will be in a strong position to help the people. We will also be mobilizing for a general amnesty which will help the country get the reconciliation that it needs so that we can move against the social exclusion that is going on right now in Haiti.

But our country’s reconciliation process should not proceed in a hypocritical way. The rebels who took weapons against the government, killed people, and destroyed public administration and public buildings are walking free on the streets and are going wherever they want to. Some of them were even candidates in the last election. If they are free, then there is no way that they should keep in jail young people from the popular neighbourhoods who used weapons to defend their rights, the rights of the voters, and the constitution. It does not make sense that there can be two sets of rules; one for the wealthy people and one for the poor people. The wealthy people are walking the streets and going free everywhere, even if they were involved in a lot of crime and infractions. So that should be the same for the people from the poor neighbourhoods who were involved in crime and infractions. They should be back in their homes and the police should pull their names off of the Research Lists [of wanted persons] that the police have put everywhere � in the radio and in the media.

SJC: We would like to ask about educational programs which were set up in the years before the coup �from 2000 onwards- and what has happened to them since. Specifically we are interested in the alpha-resto lunch programs [which combined free food with adult literacy training].

SB: Well, the main objective of the wealthy people is to stop the 85% majority of the people from having access to the wealth of the country, and they consider education to be part of the wealth of the country. Stopping us from having access to education is one way to prevent us from sharing the wealth of the country.

During Aristide’s term, education was more accessible to the people than it is now. During Aristide a lot of new schools where built, and a lot of projects were going in those schools. They were providing food to the people, they were providing uniforms for the people, and they even had subsidies for the price of the books. The parents only had to pay half or a quarter of the price of books, and that really contributed to education in Haiti.

Since the coup of February 29th, we can say that education is functioning at only 10% of its capacity in the poor neighbourhoods of Haiti.

Little children could go to school, but once above the age of 9, it was not easy. Even if they were in elementary or high school, many had to leave Bel Air because they were threatened with illegal arrests or killings. Some of the families decided to move out of Bel Air and go to some other place so that their children could go to school. It still was difficult because a lot of the parents had worked in public administration and since they had lost their jobs [ii] it was not easy to afford school in Haiti. So this is why in poor neighbourhoods education is a big issue and concern for the families.

Even the schools which are near Bel Air, many of them were not functional because a lot of them have been used as a camp or barracks for the black uniformed Haitian Police or UN.

This is why for the last two years, a lot of young folks from Bel Air were not going to school and it is clear that the transitional government has not really helped in any way to relieve the situation in the poor neighbourhoods. No subsidies on school fees. No rehabilitation of public schools. No subsidies on the price of gas, which affects the price of transportation to get the children to school and at the same time the price of everything. So people have a problem getting access to basic needs and they give priority to food and not education. Even projects like the feeding programs that used to be run under the Aristide government have stopped, so even the children who go to school do not have access to one hot meal a day.

In the poor neighbourhoods, what we consider the biggest threat or violence against us is when we wake up in the morning and we don’t know what we are going to eat during the day. This is considered one of the biggest forms of violence against the people in the poor neighbourhoods.

SJC: So speaking of that kind of violence, we understand that you worked in the capacity of the alpha feeding program for adults � an adult literacy program. We wanted to get a sense of what difference that program made in your neighbourhood.

SB: This was like a knife blow to the belly [iii] � when the government stopped the alpha program. Because we remember that when this program was running, it was so great to see those adults, who didn’t have the chance to know how to read when they were children, learn to read. They were so proud when they could do something in the public administration, even if they could just sign their name.

This pride was something that gave us hope for what Haiti should be. With adults having access to literacy it helped in so many other things. When they go to vote, they will know where to make their cross. Before, anyone could just say ‘put it here’ and they wouldn’t know if it was the right place. While this program was running, it was clear to us that there was a change, a good sign of hope for these people. But now that they have stopped it is like a koud kouto nan vant iii to everyone that the people stopped having access to education when they feel so close to it.

SJC: Has the UN or the Latortue government tried to fill the gap that was left by the feeding programs in Haiti?

SB: The only program that the government was involved in was to come and kill the people in the poor neighbourhoods. Prime Minister Latortue even said in a speech that “There was an operation in September 30th 2004. We shot them, some of them fell, others were injured, others ran away.”

[This was the date of a police attack on a large peaceful demonstration commemorating the date of the first coup against Aristide and calling for his return � ed.]

During the Latortue government there were a lot of violations against children of the street. They were victims of illegal arrests by the black uniformed police and they took them to a garbage dump called Titanyen and killed them. And that is why a lot of street children who were aware of the situation came to hide in Bel Air and Cite Soleil so that they could have a chance to not be killed by the national police.

When all of those children from the streets came to hide in Bel Air, we had to feed them. So that is why we had to start a little social organization where all of the people can find support so that we can decrease the level of misery in Bel Air. We started a feeding program so that people could come and get at least one hot meal per day.

SJC Who helped you with that?

SB: We had friends who were committed to helping us with this and they would come with one sack or three sacks of rice so we could share with the people and cook something and allow everyone to be a part of it. Also Yele Haiti, which is [hip-hop artist] Wyclef Jean’s foundation, contributed and gave us some food to distribute.

SJC: And most of these friends were from Haiti?

SB: Most were but also there are some international friends who have sent things to share with the children like clothes and food.

The name of the social organization is Zakat Zanfan. Zakat is an Arabic word [referring to a charitable tithe required of muslims], and Zanfan is children in Creole. We would like to make use of your microphone to call all of the international social organizations who would like to help Zakat Zanfan to contact us so that we can help the children who are in the streets in Bel Air with no families, with no parents, and who are trying to make it on their own.

SJC: What are your expectations for the Preval government in terms of help to organizations your work with

SM: As we always like to say ‘the river is wide but with god’s help we will cross it’ and we consider President Preval to be a big rock in the middle of the river that we can stand on.

The main objective is to have a real dialogue with all of the children of Haiti. We don’t believe that President Preval, just by himself will accomplish something big for the country. That is why we are calling all of the children of Haiti to gather together so we can work together and fight to have a new page of history.

As our ancestors had seen the deportation of Toussaint L’Ouverture, one of Haiti’s independence heros, so our generation has experienced the deportation of President Aristide. Our main fight right now is for this dialogue process, and one of the things that will help this dialogue process is to have Aristide be a part of it � close to the table where everyone will gather to discuss what the country needs. As President Aristide’s term was finished in 2006 and President Preval was elected fairly, and we are waiting for him to facilitate and create the conditions for the dialogue process between all of the children of the country, because as you can see now every thing is destroyed.

The only way to have this reconstruction process is to have an understanding between the people above the hill and people below the hill [wealthy people and poor people].

SJC: There have been voices in Canada calling on Preval to share power with the parties that lost the election and form what is called a ‘government of national reconciliation.’ Is that advisable or a good idea in your opinion?

SM: That is why we mentioned the dialogue process. It should involve different sectors and different affiliations. All sectors should be welcome to be part of the dialogue process and of the union government. Like Leslie Manigat [who finished second in the Presidential election with 11% of the vote]. He is still someone who has a role to play in improving the situation in Haiti.

This is not something new nor has it only been suggested in Canada. In the Preval campaign there where speeches welcoming all sectors who wanted to be part of improving the situation by reconstructing the country. He always welcomed all fractions who really wanted to do it. I can remember the words from one of Preval’s speeches from his campaign: ‘Even if I am elected I am open to dealing with people not necessarily involved in Lespwa,’ he said. ‘All people who are good patriots, who have a good will of improvement and change, I am open to working with them so that we can have a better country.’ This is something that really counts for me and I think that this is something that he should work on.

SJC: Is there a concern that elements of the interim government will continue on into the Preval government?

SM: The people don’t trust the members of the defacto government because we have already gone through another defacto government [during the military dictatorship of 1991-1994]. Both of those experiences have finished with bloodshed. So we don’t really trust the interim government representatives and it could be a big concern to have them continue in the new government that Preval is about to start. They haven’t done anything to show that they have a good will for improvement. A good example of that is that they haven’t had the courage to release even one political prisoner. They should have the courage to say that we want to release even some of the people who have been arrested illegally. And that would show that they are open to doing something positive. But since they are not doing that, it is showing people why they cannot trust them. Many of the people who have kept the interim government representatives in power, even they don’t trust them or work with them anymore.

So there’s no way that people like us, who never believed in them, would ever work with them. It is because of the dialogue process that we want to start that we do not call for the arrest of most representatives of the interim government, because that step would stop the dialogue and reconciliation process. But in reality they have accomplished so many bad things that they should be under arrest.

SJC: So you want an investigation of those people?

SM: It would be good to have an investigation so that the truth can come out about the many killings and the many massacres that have happened in popular neighbourhoods.

In Bel Air we have so many friends and so many people who have been living nearby who have died, killed in the streets. It would be good for people to know about the massacres, who was in charge of them and who was behind them. We know that the people from this interim government will have official amnesty, just like always. The former director of the police [Leon Charles] now has an international position [at the Haitian embassy in Washington]. We know that after this, Latortue will be moving to the United States, Canada, or France. They will welcome him because all of these countries keep saying that he is doing a very nice job. So we know they won’t arrest him.

SJC: I want to clarify. You’ve spoken of a general amnesty before. In other words, this would be concerning only the leadership, the investigation of major responsibility.

SB: A general amnesty should not be only for the officials, like giving a new international position to the former director of the police. it should be an open general amnesty, not only for the wealthy people from the Group 184 who have been involved in distributing weapons to some people in the poor neighbourhoods so they can infiltrate into political movements and cause disturbances in poor neighbourhoods. It should not be just an amnesty for the wealthy people, or for only people like former minister Justice [Bernard] Gousse, who is behind a lot of killings. We are recommending a general amnesty so that all sectors, whether they are in (public) life, or in the disenfranchised class, can benefit from an amnesty. Because we know that in the poor neighbourhoods, there are young police officers who were dismissed with weapons in hand. There are demobilized soldiers who are demanding the return of the army, who have weapons in their hands. But we should not excuse some people and still have Research Lists [police wanted lists] on the people in the poor neighbourhoods.

SJC: What do people in Bel Air think of Canada, considering that Canada was a supporter of the return of Aristide after the first coup, and a supporter of the interim government after the second coup?

SM: All over the country here, people know that Canada is an example of democracy to the world, and that Canada contributed a lot in planting democracy after the first coup. That’s why the people here were really surprised to see that the government of Canada was behind the coup of February 29th and also supporting the interim government that was supporting so much violence. It surprises the people to see such a transformation from the Canadian government about its policy in Haiti.

But we always like to establish the big difference between bon blans and mauvais blans [good white people and bad white people]. We know that the people in Canada have been in solidarity with us, contrary to the Foreign Affairs ministry of Canada who said that people in poor neighbourhoods have made it a no-man’s land, and are perpetrating different kinds of crime in Haiti.

There is one last example of clear evidence that the people of Canada are in solidarity with the people of Haiti, because the way that the people of Canada voted is like a response to the last government who supported the interim government in Haiti. When we talk, we are talking about the people of Canada who are in solidarity with Haiti. We will not say that the last government of Canada was bad and that the new one will be better because we don’t know if the policy will change. We don’t want to decide who is the worst and who is the best, we just hope that the people of Canada will open their eyes so that they know what the Canadian policy is in Haiti and so they know what is going on, so they can stop it when it is something bad.

SJC: We want to thank you for taking the time to talk to us.

SM & SB: Thank you.

[i] Transcribed from English-Creole translation. Some inconsistencies of exact translation may be present.
[ii] An estimated 4000 government workers were fired by the interim government, many of whom were from poor/popular neighbourhoods.
[iii] Exact translation: koud kouto nan vant, literally meaning a knife blow to the stomach. The __expression is a play on the __expression koud kouto nan do which translates to “a stab in the back.”

**********************

AUMOHD IN ACTION FOR HUMAN RIGHT IN HAITI

Dear Everyone,

AUMOHD AND THE CHRC (Community Human Rights Council) of Gran Ravin, Citè Soleil and Pele

Since the massacre which took place in Martissant and Gran Ravin on August 20 and 21, 2005 which counted more than 50 dead, disappeared and a hundred victims of gunshots and machete hacking, the Executive Council of AUMOHD thought it was important and necessary to establish in these neighborhoods subject to abuses of human rights a group of citizens called CHRC, meaning Community Human Rights Council.

Currently AUMOHD has already established this kind of community link and human rights promoters in Gran Ravin, Cit� Soleil, Pele and very soon at Crois des bouquets.

The CHRC is an organization of AUMOHD created for the principal purpose of promoting peace, security and social justice in the core of neighborhoods known as places where human rights are under attack. Each CHRC is made up of 11 members as follows:

2 representatives from churches
2 representatives from schools
2 representatives from street vendors
2 victims of injustice
2 community leaders
Legal Assistant from AUMOHD

ROLE OF THE CHRC AND AUMOHD

The CHRC plays a leadership role and liaison in dealing with violations of rights of the people, individual freedom (illegal arrests, intimidation), right to security and it seeks to obtain and maintain peace and good understanding between the neighborhoods and people in conflict.

RESULTS ALREADY OBTAINED BY THE CHRC AND AUMOHD

1. CHRC/AUMOHD GRAN RAVIN

At Gran Ravin a cease fire and peace agreement has been arrived at between the armed men of Gran Ravin, Ti Bwa, Descartes and Sore. This was thanks to many meetings, discussions and negotiations which took place with the citizens of the area, street merchants, police and UN authorities, leaders from the above mentioned neighborhoods.. We have to keep in mind that this conflict cost the life of more than 20 persons and many wounded.

2. CHRC/AMOHD Citè Soleil

At Citè Soleil a group of 50 disadvantaged children have taken the route to school, a campaign of awareness of the act of birth for all children of Citè Soleil (only birth can establish the nationality of someone).

In addition at Citè Soleil many citizens have been liberated immediately after their arbitrary arrest by the police or by the UN soldiers.

Currently we have been looking at a center for midwives who will help pregnant women who cannot pay the high fees charged by the hospitals and for those who can�t go away for lack of transportation or financial means.

3. CHRC/AUMOHD Pele

Thanks to the CHRC of Pele a group of 63 young girls and boys arrested and detained illegally and arbitrarily have been found in different detention centers among whom are those without parents or family who are arrested and thrown into prison without any medical or social assistance until the arrival of the legal assistance team of AUMOHD. It must be mentioned that among these persons arrested and detained outside of the law established by the Constitution and the country�s procedures two thirds are people extremely poor and disadvantaged who cannot even pay the fees for the papers to get out of prison. Currently nine (9) of them are already free and AUMOHD has seven orders for being freed who will be freed on Monday (3/13/06) if we have found the means to pay for the court papers and for the delivery of the papers. Among those people arrested and illegally detained the case of Mr. Marxo JOSEPH, a school teacher and leader of the neighborhood is the unprecedented result of the importance of this organization of AUMOHD which keeps us informed about all kinds of violations in these disadvantaged neighborhoods well known for human rights violations.

IMMEDIATE NEEDS OF THE CHRC/AUMOHD

Communication, telephones, radios, phone cards, board for meetings with markers, paper, white boards, notebooks, pens; transportation---gas, bus

The Four Newly Freed Are:

1. Marjorie LOUIS, arrested January 30, 2005 at Drouillard a zone of Cit� Soleil by UN soldiers. She is 16 years old, therefore a minor and she has no mother. She sells wood-sorrel; her father, Mr. Adolphe LOUIS is at Zanglais in the department of Grand Anse. She was accused of associating with bandits without any proof. She is now free thanks to AUMOHD.

2. Edith PIERRE, arrested and detained Jan. 3, 2005 at the Delmas police station as she was visiting her brother Eddy PIERRE who was arrested Feb. 28, 2005. She was arrested by agents of the national police of the same station. She was accused of associating with bandits with no proof. She is the mother of 2 children who were abandoned at the time of her arrest. She is now free thanks to AUMOHD.

3. Esperanta JEANTY, arrested Jan. 27, 2006 at Citè Soleil by MINUSTAH. She is 20 years old. She was accused of associating with bandits without any proof. She is now free thanks to AUMOHD.

4. Cadette JUNIOR, arrested November 27 2005 at Citè Soleil on the road to Pele. She was accused of associating with bandits. She is an orphan. She is now free thanks to AUMOHD.

It must be noted that the list of young people found in the prisons and detention centers continues to grow each day.

ATTENTION! If you wish to contribute to this program of bringing justice immediately to these youths arrested and detained illegally, contact us at the following places:
_______________________________________________

AUMOHD DWA MOUN
4, Delmas 47 et Rue BOUKMAN
Phone: 509-424-3334 – 509-213-3089
e-mail: aumohddwamoun@yahoo.fr

PayPal (www.hurah.revolt.org/hurah/fundraising/paypal.html)
***

To send donations to AUHOHD VIA Fonkoze:

Information on Fonkoze:

_____________________________________________

NEW-YORK,NY 10156 TEL:(212)809-1850

Bank Name:City National Bank of New Jersey

Bank Address: 900 Broad Street Newark,NJ 07102

Bank Telephone: (973) 624-0865

ABA

Number: 0212-0163-9 City of NJ Newark

For further credit to:

Account Name: Fonkoze

Account Address: Avenue Jean Paul II #7 (l’interieur) Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Account Number: 0016-11380

If you send a check or money order, make it payable to Fonkoze and mail it to City National Bank of New Jersey at the address provided above. Please do NOT include additional letters or information with the check.

Evel FANFAN (AUMOHD) account number: 01-000-9756

At the same time that you send the deposit to City National Bank of New Jersey (CNB), send us an email at fundnotice@aol.com , fundnotice@fonkoze.org or call us at 1-800-293-0308 to let us know (1) how much you sent; (2) the name on the account(s) in which you want the money to be deposited; and (3) the number of the account(s).

CNB reports all deposits to our account on a daily basis.

As soon as we see that your deposit has arrived at CNB, the funds will be immediately deposited into the proper account in Haiti.

You will in turn receive a written confirmation that the deposit has been
made_____________________________________________________

For Customer Service in the United States or Canada,
call toll-free:1-800-293-0308

Isabelle Chauvette
Fonkoze Customer Service Representative:1-800-293-0308

Email: fundnotice@aol.com
fundnotice@fonkoze.org
*

For more information call:

Isabelle V. Chauvette
US Customer Service Representative
Tel: 1-800-293-0308
fundnotice@aol.com
fundnotice@fonkoze.org

******************************************

AUHOHD WANTS TO HELP LIBERATE 64 YOUNG PEOPLE – AUMOHD Vle Libere 64 Jen
************************************************************************
Folks,

Aumohd, are young defense lawyers in Haiti who work tirelessly and virtually for free to help defendants who have no representation whatsoever and are being warehoused in the worst prison conditions in this Hemisphere. Sometimes when they�re picked up their families cannot find out where they are, if alive or dead. Even to bring food to them is a problem for mothers without means, not to mention transportation. AUMOHD helps locate the whereabouts of many prisoners and give them their first contact with family members and a sense that they have not been abandoned. Most of these prisoners are young men and women who were picked up, by MINUSTHA, or the police, simply because they live in poor neighborhoods. All the ones listed below are not charge with any crimes at all but held in prison for the catchall, and very abusive “associating with bad people!!!” – association de malfaiteurs.

Some have been in prison for over a year without ever being charged or to see a judge. Below, AUMOHD has manage to give names to of these 64 young people listed below and indefinitely warehoused Haiti. HLLN would like to follow these 64 cases, support AUMOHD to represent these young folks, get their stories published internationally and generally help to see that justice is done and that, if the only charge against them is “associating with bad people” that they are immediately set free.

HLLN collaborates with AUMOHD and supports these young Haitian lawyers and human right activists, led by Evel Fanfan, breaking new ground in Haiti by representing the poor. Haiti does not have a defense bar. This is practically the only group to give legal representation the poor of Haiti out of a sense of commitment that exists in Haiti. HLLN is proud to say we introduced AUMOHD work internationally and have help, these law two years to support it financially, and with resources such as computers, internet access and by publicizing their work, as much as possible.

But our resources are depleted this year. It’s been two long years and HLLN supports many grass-roots folks in Haiti without any means to do their work. AUMOHD, in fact, no longer has an office and is working without an office but still going into Haiti’s jails, everyday, speaking to the de facto authorities, pushing to bring to court the cases of nameless children, women and men in Haiti to resolution.

Below is AUMOHD’s recent appeal for help. We highly urge all in our network who are able, to make a donation directly, as indicated by Me Evel Fanfan, to help these young Haitian lawyers pushing to help those without a voice in Haiti. We must empower Haitians who empower Haitians. Thank you.

Please, remember to cc to HLLN any correspondence to Me Evel Fanfan so we may let our entire Network know of your help and contributions to these young Haitian lawyers important and life saving work. You may also consider “in kind” donation such as cell cards, computers, food donations, visiting prisoners to give them an international profile if you’re in Haiti, writing to them, writing their personal stories to validate their significance as human beings, or, setting up radio interviews to follow AUMODH’s progress and give encouragement to the 64 detainees and their families. There are people suffering right this moment, who have committed no crime and who need the help these young Haitian lawyers in Haiti can provide. Please help them if you can. Mesi anpil

Men Anpil Chay Pa Lou!!!

HLLN
March 1, 2006
*

To send donations to AUHOHD VIA Fonkoze:

Information on Fonkoze:

_____________________________________________

NEW-YORK,NY 10156 TEL:(212)809-1850

Bank Name:City National Bank of New Jersey

Bank Address: 900 Broad Street Newark,NJ 07102

Bank Telephone: (973) 624-0865

ABA

Number: 0212-0163-9 City of NJ Newark

For further credit to:

Account Name: Fonkoze

Account Address: Avenue Jean Paul II #7 (l’interieur) Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Account Number: 0016-11380

If you send a check or money order, make it payable to Fonkoze and mail it to City National Bank of New Jersey at the address provided above. Please do NOT include additional letters or information with the check.

Evel FANFAN (AUMOHD) account number: 01-000-9756

At the same time that you send the deposit to City National Bank of New Jersey (CNB), send us an email at fundnotice@aol.com , fundnotice@fonkoze.org or call us at 1-800-293-0308 to let us know (1) how much you sent; (2) the name on the account(s) in which you want the money to be deposited; and (3) the number of the account(s).

CNB reports all deposits to our account on a daily basis.

As soon as we see that your deposit has arrived at CNB, the funds will be immediately deposited into the proper account in Haiti.

You will in turn receive a written confirmation that the deposit has been
made_____________________________________________________

For Customer Service in the United States or Canada,
call toll-free:1-800-293-0308

Isabelle Chauvette
Fonkoze Customer Service Representative:1-800-293-0308

Email: fundnotice@aol.com
fundnotice@fonkoze.org
*

For more information call:

Isabelle V. Chauvette
US Customer Service Representative
Tel: 1-800-293-0308
fundnotice@aol.com
fundnotice@fonkoze.org

******************************************

***************************

Date: Wed, 1 Mar 2006 18:19:40 +0100 (CET)
From: Send an Instant Message “evel fanfan” <fanfanmel@yahoo.fr>

Subject: AUMOHD vle libere 64 jen .
To: erzilidanto@yahoo.com

Bonjou e one respe pou tout moun !!!!!!!!!

Se you plezi pou Komite AUMOHD la pou li kominike ou ak tout kominote fre ak se ayisyen nou yo ki nan Canada you lis de 64 jen gason ak fi minustah te arete e genbe nan prizon ilegalman. AUMOHD vle ede jen sa yo jwen liberasyon yo ki te arete nan Pele, cite soley ak Cite milite. Nou komanse deja libere 5 la dan yo e nou vle libere tout avan mwa mas la fini.

Konsa nou vle tout moun ki kapab ede nou nan gwo travay sa. nou vle non selman libere yo men tou akonpagne yo pou lapolis ak minustah pa kontnye arete yo.

si you moun vle ede nou libere jen sa yo, yo kapab voye supo pa yo nan Fonkoze Haiti nan kont AUMOHD ki se: 01-000-9756 ou nenpot ki jan yo kapab fe sa.

Nou di tout moun ki vle ede nan program sa mesi anpil

Men lis la !!!!!!!

AUMOHD/ CCDH/ PELE

Liste des jeunes arr&#65533;t&#65533;s et d&#65533;tenus ill&#65533;galement au P&#65533;nitencier National

1.-Sajous beter, arrete le 9 sept 2005 a Cite Soleil (
2.-Cadet Junior, arrete le 17 Novembre 2005 a Cite soleil-Pele
3.-Schilet Noelsin, arrete le 17 Sept 2005 a Cite soleil- Pele
4.-Jean Andre, arrete le 17 Nov 2005
5.- Abichet Lonal, arrete le 2 Janvier 2006 a Cite Soleil-Pele
6.- Valon Lesly arrete 5 Dec. 2005
7.- Louis Dorlus, arrte le 14 dec. 2005
8.- Theodor chenel, arrete le 24 Dec 2005
9.- Losil Samuel, arrete le 8 Dec 2005 ( un ancien travailleur d’Aristide)
10.-Pierre Ashnael, arrete 30 dec 2005
11.- michel Mario, arrete le 30 Dec 2005
12.- Franz Albert, arrete le 18 Fevrier 2005
13.-Leonard Kopinokey, arrete le 6 Dec. 2005
14.- Pierre Dario,
15.- Cheristin Augustin, aka YOUYOU
16.-Herold Pierre, arrete 17 Nov 2005
17.- Eric Pierre, arrete le 17 Nov 2005
18.-Jean Chanel, arrete le 14 Dec. 2005
19.-Guercon Clergeo, arrete le 17 nov 2005
20.- jimmy Alexis, arrete le 10 Janvier 2006
21. Antoine Joachin
22. Moise Clofa
23. Nesly Gasten 27 Janv
24. Pernason Raphael Jean
25. Benoit Wilner
26. Oxilien Francois
27. Jean Samuel
28. Luckner Fleurantin
29. Oneste Louis
30. Vincent Patrick
31. Afie Guerdy
32. Rodrigue Malbranche
33. Jean Paul
34. Pierre Richard
35. Thelusma Wagers
36. Nadeige Pierre
37. Geraldy Volcy
38. Marjorie Louis
39. Esperanta Jean
40.Jean Ergot Laurent
41. Bien Aime Kenold
42. Dicenat LuFrand
43. Belet Fedner
44. Sainly Johny
45. Bernard Gerard Junior
46. Bernard Azicodem
47. Milo R Jean Mare
48. Gean Febric le bonord
49. Chrilonme L&#65533;Homdan
50. Jean Charls Odin
51. Dorci Jean Michel
52. Joseph Maxo
53. Elder Martherson
54. Alexis Dimonly
55. Brunach Enoch
56. Majeur Dikson
57. Saunt Louis Patinert
58. Laborole Sergot
59. Pierre Jackson
60. Nestra Dieulhomme
61. Sinal Wilkenn
62. Raoul Rouzier (libere)
63. Janvier JUNIOR 23 Dec. 2005, ref : titit- pele
64.-Yves MORIN

Liste des liberes par AUMOHD le 23 F&#65533;vrier 2006
1.- Cadet Junior, arrète le 17 Novembre 2005 a Cite soleil Pelè
2.- Raoul Rouzier
3.- Rodrigue Malbranche
4.- Joseph Marxo
5.- Moise Clofa

Il faut noter qu’il y a une seule espèce de charge contre ses pauvres jeunes : Association de malfaiteurs

Liste collectè par AUMOHD DWA MOUN

___________________________
Evel FANFAN
President AUMOHD
4, Delmas 47
Phone: 509-4243334
E-mail: fanfanmel@yahoo.fr

***
*************************************

The photographs, and a lot more are from the Civil War in Liberia and were taken in 2003 by Chris Hondros. You may check them at: www.chrishondrosphotography.com

*********

Site Solèy demonstration to demand arrest of Gèrard Latortue, Andy Apaid and Reginald Boulos, from the Ezili Danto Witness Project,

Ezili Danto Witness Project brings you an English translation of another Kreyol Reporting and Interview Direct from the Streets of Site Solèy Haiti, March 15, 2006 (Broadcast in Kreyol on Levekanpe Radio ? March 15, 2006 ? 10:00 am) Translation done for HLLN from Kreyol original by Frantz Jerome

Reporter/Haiti Contact: We are going to Site Solèy where yesterday, the inhabitants of Site Solèy organized a demonstration to ask that de facto Prime Minister Gérard Latortue be arrested. The inhabitants of Site Solèy intend to file charges against Andy Apaid and Reginald Boulos as well. What prompted them to file charges against Reginald Boulos is the world-wide propagation of images of armed ?kids? (8 to 15 years of age), armed with sophisticated weapons such as rocket launchers, on Boulos? website, in an effort to criminalize the Site Solèy population that they qualified of assassins. The population of Site Solèy is very upset and they contracted lawyers to file charges against Reginald Boulos.

The images you can see include images like one of a ?boy? who can?t be more that 15 years old and underneath the image the caption reads: ?Thank you TiTid (nick name for Aristide) for the weapon you gave me
?, when in reality it is the picture of some children who participated in the Liberian conflict, according to our information. Therefore, they will file charges against Reginald Boulos and Andy Apaid, also for the distributions of arms that they have staged in Site Solèy. Quite a few young men are ready to testify about the nature of their relationship with Boulos and Apaid.

Right now, we will speak to General TouTou, who is inside Site Solèy. DCPJ has a list of name that has been sent to the media, that they are looking for, to be put in jail. General Toutou was in Bel-Air and left Bel-Air for Site Solèy where he went to reinforce the combatants under fire. Today he is answering the French ambassador who said that no amnesty will be extended to certain criminals that he qualified as bandits. General Toutou called upon the French ambassador to be careful, for Haiti has a constitution and that those who defended this constitution, those who stopped the systematic killing of militants working for change, picked up arms because they were forced to do so, according to General Toutou?s answer to the French ambassador.

Gen. Toutou: ?
the French ambassador [inaudible] we are liberators who were fighting to free Haiti, and if he is keeping up with the event, he must have noticed that those who kept the country hostage did not even pick-up 2 to 3% of the electorate?s support in the last elections. God gave us strength and courage, the same way he gave Moise the mission of liberating the people of Israel. He gave me a mission. Me, Toutou, to free the people of Haiti from the yoke of kidnappers – this small group of criminals, these forces of evil, part of the Civil society: Charles Henry Baker, Reginald Boulos, Andy Apaid.

?Under the leadership of Gerard Latortue and its criminal de facto government [barely audible because of music in background ? approximately 17 seconds] (I took power away from them. We liberated the people. If we are criminal

because we were fighting for change in this country. The French ambassador should

February 7, the day of the elections
) [end of music]
the disorder was sponsored by these guys who were sponsoring turmoil in the poor neighborhoods, sponsoring the destruction of the country, sponsoring kidnapping of people, at the request of the head of the kidnapping gang, who is Michael Lisius, the current director of DCPJ. He has gangs kidnapping for him in the popular neighborhoods so that he can say its from the popular neighborhoods and accuse the people of Bel-Air, Site Solèy, Gran Ravin, Solino. We are telling Michael Lisius that he can wait what is coming to him. He is killing in the popular neighborhoods, drinking the people?s blood while on the down low he participates in drug trafficking. These people traffic in drugs and sponsor turmoil in the popular neighborhoods, diverting the international community?s attention towards the deaths, while their drug trafficking is going on full scale. I?ll take this opportunity to tell you that it is this Michael Lisius who took US$500,000.00 from Charles Henry Baker, Reginald Boulos, Andy Apaid, for a media campaign with a list of young men?s names as if they are the ones who were reeking havoc. We say that the ones who were reeking havoc are named: Andy Apaid, Reginald Boulos, Charles Henry Baker, Gerard Latortue, the former director of police, Leon Charles. They are the one who caused turmoil, Bernard Gousse, Carlo Lochard, Renand Etienne, they are the culprits, Mrs. Coicou, Mrs. Gessy Comeau-Coicou, these are the people that were reeking havoc. When they finished killing in the popular neighborhoods, Mrs. Coicou always claimed that it is bandits that they killed.

The press is yet to film one of these dead people with a gun next to them. Still, Mrs. Coicou calls them bandits and then presents arms that supposedly they took from them. Once inside the popular neighborhoods, they sometimes kill 20 people leave them laying on the ground and then call them bandits. We are telling these people

?

[inaudible voice asking a question]

Gen. Toutou: ?Michael Lisius and the private sector they are the ones paying for the turmoil
?

Interviewer : ?We heard your name on the Michael Lisius list
?

Gen. Toutou: ?My name is listed, I, Toutou, Nicolas
Ogidson(?), former commander of Bel-Air.We were leading a political struggle in Bel-Air. My name is listed as a way to make me anxious. It leaves me cool, what Michael Lisius

I know he has money. He was paid and he must do his bosses requests
?

Reporter: Here you have it, that was Toutou, who is General. Thomas Ogisson(?) he is, and he claims that he will not buckle under the pressure or panic Gen. Toutou. He promised a detailed interview to Levekanpe, about disarmament. Along with him we went to Site Solèy, in Bwa Nèf , in the area of Dwouya. We have a lot of information about Site Solèy. When we reached Bwa nèf around the house of Drèd Wilme, we noticed that the UN soldiers destroyed these houses in Bwa Nèf.
***
END OF RADIO EXCERPT TRANSLATED FROM KREYOL ORIGINAL INTO ENGLISH FOR, Ezili Danto Witness Project, March 15, 2006

*********

----- Original Message -----
From: zili danto
To: Gousse
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2006 7:05 AM
Subject: Re: Photo showing Haitian CHILD SOLDIERS are coup d’etat propaganda, LIES, LIES

First, I don’t answer questions from annonymous people who do not sign their names to their posts and whose identity are unverifiable.

And, deux, simply and frankly, none of what you wrote “Gousse” addressed the issue at hand, which is the photos are NOT of Haitians but Liberians and being passed off as propaganda to criminalize Haiti’s young men and push for their summary execution without judicial review whatsover. That is nothing but the truth. Nothing you wrote challenges this. Circulating these pictures as “ proof “ that the poor in Haiti have weapons is spreading a lie. Se pa nous!!

The photographs, and a lot more are from the Civil War in Liberia and were taken in 2003 by Chris Hondros.

You may check them at:
www.chrishondrosphotography.com

Ezili Danto
January 26, 2006

*****************
Date: Mon, 23 Jan 2006 16:54:34 -0800 (PST)
From: “zili danto” <erzilidanto@yahoo.com> View Contact Details View Contact Details Add Mobile Alert
Subject: Photo showing Haitian CHILD SOLDIERS are coup d’etat propaganda, LIES, LIES
To: “Zili” <erzilidanto@yahoo.com>

Dear Coup D’etat Folks:

Regarding the e-mail you are circulating entitled: “Ces photos sont a voir”

It’s a lie. These pictures purportedly showing Haitian CHILD SOLDIERS led supposedly by gang leaders who say they will vote for Renè Prèval are PROPAGANDA. Its intent is to supposedly show the criminal “nature” of Haitians who support Lavalas, or, are resisting the bi-centennial coup d’etat, occupation and its massacres and its massive and unparallelled bloodbath brought to Haiti by the coup d’etat countries of France, US and Canada.

Don’t circulate these pictures and e-mail chains. You are spreading a lie. Se pa nous!!

The photographs, and a lot more are from the Civil War in Liberia and were taken in 2003 by Chris Hondros.

You may check them at:
www.chrishondrosphotography.com

These photos of Haitian CHILD SOLDIERS are a HOAX, LIES and sinister propaganda from the morally repugnant wealthy and “educated” Haitians, abroad and in Haiti, who brought us the bicentennial coup d’etat and kilings of the poor.

These coup d’etat folks may only rule through force, by telling lies and confusing decent Haitians because they can not win a fair election in Haiti. Circulating these pictures only continues to tap into the racism and stereotypes by criminalizing Haiti’s youth in order to keep the US occupation going and their illegal and imposed reign in tack.

These pictures are from the conflict in Liberia. Like Apaid, Boulos and Baker, the person who started this chain, may want to get the UN to go into Site soley and massacre more of the Haitian resistance against dictatorship, occupation and France/Canada/US fleecing of our people while Haitians abroad stay busy with shame associated with these untruths.

I don’t have the time to get the truth out to all those who saw these false pictures. Past this info on to your mailing list. These pictures of child soldiers in Haiti are a HOAX, probably by the same people wanting to continue the current blanket criminalization of young black males in Haiti and in the poor neighborhoods. And, since we know Haiti is “the poorest” that pretty much means GENOCIDE for our people. Unless the truth is told and Haiitans in the diaspora WAKE THE HELL UP and stop believing the racist HYPE, Haiti is another Rawanda in the making.

It’s absolutely inexcusable for the diaspora and so-called “educated” Haitians to continue being mired in the same old, same old propaganda about Haitian incompentency, universal brutal nature and criminal nature!!!!

Folks, we are the ONLY calvary the poor in Haiti have, let’s stop adding to their misery, death tolls by circulating these lies that will help the UN and former Haitian army, now dressed in black masks and equipped with US guns and rewarded with TEN YEARS back pay for the coup d’etat from summarily executing our Haitian youths.

Whoever is a criminals should be arrested, not summarily executed. That’s the rule of law. Let’s bring back the rule of law, the Geneva Convention, Declaration of the Rights of Man, respect for human life and its application in Haiti. Why the double standard? Are we blacks so unworthy? Desalin, Marijann, Kapwa lam&#65533;, didn’t think so. STOP spreading the morally repugnant elites’ and their tonton macoute and imperialist lies on the internet about our youths in Haiti. Help save a Haitian life. It could someday be your own.

Marguerite (Ezili Danto) Laurent, Esq.
www.margueritelaurent.com
erzilidanto@yahoo.com
Jan. 23, 2006
Every woman, man, youth and child has the human right to a life in dignity.

***

Haitian Lawyers Leadership Network
www.margueritelaurent.com/law/lawpress.html

Ezili Danto Witness Project
www.margueritelaurent.com/campaigns/campaignone/testimonies/personaltestimonies.html

News, Views. Essays and Reflections
www.margueritelaurent.com/pressclips/newsessaysreflections.html

Haitian Perspective
www.margueritelaurent.com/pressclips/law_haiti.html

Bush Bloodbath Brought to Haiti: Partial List of Victims, Massacres and Coup D’etat Abuses
www.margueritelaurent.com/law/massupdates1.html

Matters for International Tribunal and/or OAS/CARICOM/U.S. Congress Investigation of 2004 Bicentennial Coup D’etat
www.margueritelaurent.com/law/matterstoinvestigage.html

Partial List of: The Subcontracted Haitians paid by Western powers and their (IRI/NED/USAID/EU/CIDA and Breton Woods, et al..) NGO’s to feed dependency, starve democracy and foment violence and Coup D’etat in Haiti
www.margueritelaurent.com/law/haitianNGOs.html

Canada’s role in Haiti
www.margueritelaurent.com/law/canada.html

France’s Role in the Coup D’etat in Haiti * Petition Demanding France pay Haiti the 22Billion
www.margueritelaurent.com/campaigns/campaignseven/openletterfrance.html

The Constitution of Haiti, 1987
www.georgetown.edu/pdba/Constitutions/Haiti/haiti1987.html

RELEASE THE POLITICAL PRISONERS

– FREE SO ANN!!!! FREE YVON NEPTUNE, FREE JACQUES MATHELIER, FREE HAITI’S
CHILDREN, SUPPORT HAITIAN self-repect, self-defense and self-determination
www.margueritelaurent.com/solidarityday/hsd_sampleletter_res.html

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Forwarded by Ezili’s Haitian Lawyers Leadership Network
www.margueritelaurent.com
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HLLN’s Media Letter Writing Campaign: Stop Mainstream Media libelously railroading President Preval and the people of Haiti -Keep writing, denouncing these false accusations
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00027.html

Letter to the New York Times from Hazel Ross-Robinson
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00028.html

Why we cannot forget the past by Harry Comeau, A letter to Washington,
Ottowa, Paris and international media from a Haitian man
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-03/msg00000.html

Letter’s to the Media – It’s the INTERNATIONAL EFFORT that has brought Haiti
where it stands today. Stop these international LIES about Haiti, stop
stealing and calling it “helping Haiti!” | Pouki sa lapres lang long lan fin
dechennen kont pep ayisyen an?| Plans to make Haiti a penal colony and
officially under UN Protectorate proceeds
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-03/msg00002.html

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COUNT THE VOTES!!!!

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Recommended Links to HLLN Media Campaign to protect the Feb. 7th Haitian
vote:

A Basket to carry water by John Maxwell
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00025.html

Letter to the New York Times from Hazel Ross Robinson
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00028.html

HLLN’s Media Letter Writing Campaign: Stop Mainstream Media libelously railroading President Preval and the people of Haiti -Keep writing, denouncing these false accusations | letters to Newsday, Wallstreet Journal, New York Times, National Public Radio
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00027.html

Haitian Message to James Dobbins: Haiti not a US Colony, we are tired of benefactors and do-gooders
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00026.html

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Investigate the electoral fraud; COUNT ALL THE VOTES

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Listen to C-Span’s Haiti coverage; Note how Haiti Democracy Project and Washington’s first use of Jacques Bernard the way they used zealots, Leon Manus and Pierre Paquiot, to undermine Haiti’s elected government:
www.usip.org/events/2006/0222_haiti.html

Sham Elections followed by What, Politique De Doublure? by Marguerite Laurent for Haitian Perspectives, Feb. 7, 2006
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/200602/msg00002.hm

Haiti’s election crisis was made in Washington but transformed by the people of Haiti: HLLN questions MINUSTHA’s credibility, OAS&#65533;s credibility, Washington&#65533;s credibility and their allies’ credibility, willingness and ability to legitimately support and safeguard the people’s landslide mandate to President Rene Preval
www.haitiforever.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=14151#14151

HLLN’s predicts the 3 scenarios for these elections, dated Feb. 7, 2006
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00002.html

Fraud anticipated to compel a second round, Feb. 7, 2006
www.haitiforever.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=13774#13774

HLLN Report on Haitian Election Laws, Feb. 14, 2006 – the CEP is no authority to COUNT or EXAMINE ballots, this is left to the polling stations. Go to:
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00012.html

Jacques Bernard, the Frenchmen accused of ballot stuffing and electoral fraud in Haiti is Welcome to the US by Haiti Democracy Project and Scheduled to Address HDP Seminar | J.Bernard, another Zealot, like Manus and Paquiot, HDP will use to destabilize Haiti’s elected President
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00022.html

The Smoking Gun – Photos of STOLEN ballots found in garbage dump in Haiti | Brazil backs Preval as victor in elections | Smashed ballot boxes found in Haiti, et al
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00014.html

Count the missing ballots received Wed. Feb. 15, 2006 by Ezili Danto Why did the CEP choose to COUNT the blank ballots on a pro-rata basis but to not count the missing ballots from Sainte Trinit&#65533; School, Carrefour-Feuilles, Abricots and other places that had gone missing but recovered and clearly available to be ADDED into the overall tally of votes on Wed. Feb. 15, 2006?
www.haitiforever.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=14202#14202

Jacques Bernard, the Electoral Council’s director accused of stuffing ballots with blank votes, flees Haiti – Haiti Election Chief Flees Country
https://lists.riseup.net/www/arc/ezilidanto/2006-02/msg00021.html

– FREE SO ANN!!!! FREE YVON NEPTUNE, FREE JACQUES MATHELIER, FREE HAITI’S
CHILDREN, SUPPORT HAITIAN self-repect, self-defense and self-determination
www.margueritelaurent.com/solidarityday/hsd_sampleletter_res.html
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